What is the frame narrative of The Canterbury Tales?

What is the frame narrative of The Canterbury Tales?

“The Canterbury Tales” by Geoffrey Chaucer is a frame narrative, or a story in which a main story incorporates or frames a number of other stories. The purpose of the frame tale in frame narratives is essentially to provide the other stories a context; it typically has little storyline of its own. The following stories, on the other hand, are often of a different genre and have a distinct beginning, middle, and finish. The journey to Canterbury serves as the poem’s frame narrative in “The Canterbury Tales”.

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The Wife of Bath’s Tale and character analysis

The Wife of the Bath tale and Character analysis

Geoffrey Chaucer wrote the well-known framing narrative “The Canterbury Tales sometime between 1387 and 1400. A group of 30 pilgrims who are traveling from London to Canterbury are the subject of the storyline. To amuse themselves while traveling, the pilgrims consent to take part in a storytelling competition. Each tale in The Canterbury Tales has a prologue that introduces the character giving the tale. The Knight, the Merchant, and the Friar are a few of “The Canterbury Tales” most popular characters, but the Wife of Bath is possibly the most well-known.

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Elizabethan Poetry characteristics

Elizabethan Poetry characteristics

Elizabethan age was not just about drama, theatrical skills and theatre, but it was the foundational period that set the stage for a wide range of genres that would later become popular. Elizabethan age refers to the rule of Queen Elizabeth from 1588 to 1603. The poetry of the Elizabethan era was substantially different from that of the Middle Ages. There was some continuity, nevertheless, that made it seem almost as though medieval history and traditions continued into the Elizabethan era. At the same time, the viewpoint was drastically different and more modern because of the consequences of the Reformation and the influence of the Renaissance. Thus, while they have similarities, they also differ in terms of concept, subject matter, approach, attitude, etc.

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Waiting for Godot as an tragicomedy

Waiting for Godot as a tragicomedy

Comedy and tragedy coexist in tragicomedies. This means that the work includes amusing scenarios that will make the spectator or reader laugh or smile as well as those that will make them sad or uncomfortable due to tragic circumstances or happenings. The story may have a number of terrible incidents, but it usually has a joyful ending—typically following a string of misfortunes. The majority of the characters’ actions and statements are exaggerated, and jokes are woven throughout the narrative to lift the mood.

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Restoration Comedy | Comedy of Manners characteristics

Comedy of manners

Under the Puritan era, the English theater underwent an extremely challenging time. After Charles I’s overthrow in 1642, the theater, which had experienced tremendous popularity throughout Elizabeth’s reign, was officially shut down by an ordinance of Parliament. Drama was inactive and no public acting was permitted. Charles II ascended to the throne once more in 1660. Drama was also formally welcomed back to England with his comeback. The comedy, a social study and a replica of the pervasive sickness of the artificial, aristocratic English society of the period, is seen to be the main attraction of the Restoration theater. Congreve, Etherege, Wycherley, Farquhar, and Vanbrugh are the major creators of this new genre of comedic plays.

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Restoration Theatre | Restoration Drama Characteristics

Restoration Theater

Under Puritan rigidity, the English theater underwent a particularly difficult time. After Charles I’s deposition in the same year (1642), the theater, which had seen tremendous popularity throughout the reigns of Elizabeth and the Stuarts, was formally closed by an order of Parliament. Up to the reinstatement of the monarchy in 1660, theater was not permitted to be performed in public and was inactive.

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Keats as a romantic poet

keats as a romantic poet

Unquestionably, Keats was one of the most significant figures of early nineteenth-century Romanticism, a movement that promoted the importance of the natural world and the purity of passion and imagination. The beauty of nature, the connection between creativity and imagination, how the feelings react to sorrow and beauty, and the impermanence of human life are just a few of the concepts and topics that are obvious in Keats’ famous odes. The odes’ lavish sensory language, idealistic devotion for truth and beauty, and passionate anguish in the face of death are all Romantic preoccupations—yet they are also all distinctively Keats’s.

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