Restoration Theatre | Restoration Drama Characteristics

Restoration Theater

Under Puritan rigidity, the English theater underwent a particularly difficult time. After Charles I’s deposition in the same year (1642), the theater, which had seen tremendous popularity throughout the reigns of Elizabeth and the Stuarts, was formally closed by an order of Parliament. Up to the reinstatement of the monarchy in 1660, theater was not permitted to be performed in public and was inactive.

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Keats as a romantic poet

keats as a romantic poet

Unquestionably, Keats was one of the most significant figures of early nineteenth-century Romanticism, a movement that promoted the importance of the natural world and the purity of passion and imagination. The beauty of nature, the connection between creativity and imagination, how the feelings react to sorrow and beauty, and the impermanence of human life are just a few of the concepts and topics that are obvious in Keats’ famous odes. The odes’ lavish sensory language, idealistic devotion for truth and beauty, and passionate anguish in the face of death are all Romantic preoccupations—yet they are also all distinctively Keats’s.

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Shakespeare as a dramatist

Shakespeare as a dramatist

William Shakespeare, who lived from 1564 to 1616, is often regarded as the greatest poet and dramatist in history. He is frequently referred to as the “Bard of Avon” and England’s national poet. He has written about 39 plays, 154 sonnets, two lengthy narrative poems, and a few other verses, including works with collaborators. Ben Jonson comments, “He was not of an age, but for all time,” paying him a high tribute. Shakespeare is the Proteus of the theater, taking on every persona and experiencing all aspects of human nature.

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Hellenism in John Keats’s poetry

Hellenism in John Keats' poetry

Keats, in the words of Shelley, “was a Greek.” Indeed, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and even Shelley could not claim to be Greek thinkers in the same way that Keats could. Keats was introduced to the Greek spirit through literature, sculpture, and an intrinsic tendency. Keats often performs at his best while under the influence of Greek culture.

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Autobiographical elements in Samson Agonistes

Autobiographical elements in Samson Agonistes

One of the most striking aspects of the play “Samson Agonistes” is how it demonstrates the significant effect that Milton‘s own life experiences had on the creation of this play. By the year 1652, Milton was completely blind. Ten years previously, in 1642, he had married Mary Powell. Milton was a Republican by faith, which made him hostile to monarchy. He had vociferously opposed the death of Charles I in 1640 and afterwards served as Cromwell’s Latin Secretary during the English Commonwealth era. Milton was imprisoned during the Restoration in 1660 as a result of his anti-royalist opinions and writings from the Commonwealth era. Several friends and well-wishers had toilsomely fought on his behalf to spare him from an extended detention. He had money problems, and his home’s ambiance was not conducive to his well-being. Milton had suffered from a number of setbacks, including blindness, a failed marriage, political persecution, gout, and financial problems. When he penned (during 1667-69)Samson Agonistes“, we can only imagine how sad he must have felt.

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Deconstruction | Jacques Derrida | English Literature

Deconstruction in English Literature

Initiated by Jacques Derrida in the late 1960s, the idea of deconstruction had a significant impact on literary studies by the 1970s and 1980s. Phrases like “the transcendental signified,” and “random play of signifiers” are connected to deconstructive critique. The most well-known figures in this field are Geoffrey Hartman, Jacques Derrida, and Luce Irigaray.