Waiting for Godot as an tragicomedy

Waiting for Godot as a tragicomedy

Comedy and tragedy coexist in tragicomedies. This means that the work includes amusing scenarios that will make the spectator or reader laugh or smile as well as those that will make them sad or uncomfortable due to tragic circumstances or happenings. The story may have a number of terrible incidents, but it usually has a joyful ending—typically following a string of misfortunes. The majority of the characters’ actions and statements are exaggerated, and jokes are woven throughout the narrative to lift the mood.

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Arms and the Man as an anti-romantic comedy

Arms and the Man as an anti-romantic comedy

“Arms and the Man” is a famous play written by George Barnard Shaw that was first performed on April 21, 1984. This play uncovers the falseness of the war and deals with the two-facedness of human nature. It is regarded as an anti-romantic play because through this play Shaw has criticized the dreamlike worship of life. The play is also a comedy because in it Shaw has openly ridiculed the futility of romantic love and the idea of war. We can also call Shaw’s play a didactic play because the aim of the dramatist is to show his readers the reality of love and war. 

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Waiting for Godot as an absurd play

Waiting for Godot as an absurd play

When Martin Esslin published his book The Theater of Absurd in 1960, only then did the phrase “Theater of Absurd” become popular. The theatre of absurd illustrates an attitude and a frame of mind towards life, where human existence is a conundrum of illogical, senseless, and hopeless activity.

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Death of a Salesman as a modern tragedy | Arthur Miller |

Death of a Saleman as a modern tragedy

Arthur Miller’s famous drama “Death of a Salesman” is regarded as one of the most impressive pieces of work of art in the 20th century. It examines the psychological turmoil of the hero named Willy, and the competitive and commercialized society’s influence on his life. “Death of a Salesman” is called modern tragedy because it does not obey the concept of Greek tragedy or the traditional concept of tragedy.

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