What is the frame narrative of The Canterbury Tales?

What is the frame narrative of The Canterbury Tales?

“The Canterbury Tales” by Geoffrey Chaucer is a frame narrative, or a story in which a main story incorporates or frames a number of other stories. The purpose of the frame tale in frame narratives is essentially to provide the other stories a context; it typically has little storyline of its own. The following stories, on the other hand, are often of a different genre and have a distinct beginning, middle, and finish. The journey to Canterbury serves as the poem’s frame narrative in “The Canterbury Tales”.

Read more

Elizabethan Poetry characteristics

Elizabethan Poetry characteristics

Elizabethan age was not just about drama, theatrical skills and theatre, but it was the foundational period that set the stage for a wide range of genres that would later become popular. Elizabethan age refers to the rule of Queen Elizabeth from 1588 to 1603. The poetry of the Elizabethan era was substantially different from that of the Middle Ages. There was some continuity, nevertheless, that made it seem almost as though medieval history and traditions continued into the Elizabethan era. At the same time, the viewpoint was drastically different and more modern because of the consequences of the Reformation and the influence of the Renaissance. Thus, while they have similarities, they also differ in terms of concept, subject matter, approach, attitude, etc.

Read more

Shakespeare as a dramatist

Shakespeare as a dramatist

William Shakespeare, who lived from 1564 to 1616, is often regarded as the greatest poet and dramatist in history. He is frequently referred to as the “Bard of Avon” and England’s national poet. He has written about 39 plays, 154 sonnets, two lengthy narrative poems, and a few other verses, including works with collaborators. Ben Jonson comments, “He was not of an age, but for all time,” paying him a high tribute. Shakespeare is the Proteus of the theater, taking on every persona and experiencing all aspects of human nature.

Read more

Deconstruction Theory | Jacques Derrida | English Literature

Deconstruction in English Literature

Initiated by Jacques Derrida in the late 1960s, the idea of deconstruction had a significant impact on literary studies by the 1970s and 1980s. Phrases like “the transcendental signified,” and “random play of signifiers” are connected to deconstructive critique. The most well-known figures in this field are Geoffrey Hartman, Jacques Derrida, and Luce Irigaray.

Structuralism in English literature

Structuralism-in-English-Literature

Ferdinand de Saussure is most known today for his 1916 publication, Cours de Linguistique Générale, which is essentially a compilation of his lectures. The English version of the same text was eventually published as Course in General Linguistics. Saussure contends that language functions as a structure.

Transcendentalism in American Literature

Transcendentalism in American Literature

A theological, intellectual, and literary movement known as transcendentalism emerged in the eastern United States during the first half of the nineteenth century. In opposition to empiricists and rationalists, the transcendentalists had doubts about knowledge derived from either perception or rationality. They asserted that knowledge should come from personal revelation and intuition rather than through human skepticism.

Read more